River Walk Revitalization Petition

171122 Next Steps.jpg

The SHADE Urban Acupuncture Project envisions Chinatown as a diverse, multi-generational destination for both local residents and tourists. We can celebrate Chinatown’s rich heritage through the sustainable design of this community – its right-of-ways, historic facades, public spaces, amenities, and interpretive elements. We can strengthen Chinatown’s economic productivity by enhancing its physical connections to its adjacent districts and water frontage through intentionally designed pedestrian, bicycle, vehicular, and rail transit infrastructure.

Of the 12 project concepts proposed by the Chinatown Urban Acupuncture Project, we are requesting funding that was appropriated in 2016 (Ordinance 16-15, FY 2017) for the River Walk Market Project to design/build two modular market kiosks by using the existing trellis columns along College Walk and River Street.

The adaptive re-use of the former trellis structures would allow for business creation and expansion. Kiosk businesses should complement nearby businesses. New vendors could potentially include a newsstand, café, ice cream/shave ice, crack seed, or police outpost. Energy demands could be provided by roof top solar panels, a new grid connection, or both.

Currently, Riverwalk lacks the amenities necessary to make River Street a potential destination spot. By adding these inexpensive structures along River Walk, they will address issues of congestion, deteriorating infrastructure, sense of security, and environmental health in order to assist Chinatown to be a safer and healthier sustainable neighborhood. But in order to make River Walk a destination spot, the funding for the kiosk structures is vital which is why we need your support.

Petition will be forwarded to Councilmember Carol Fukunaga for her use.

 

If you would to help turn this market kiosk proof of concept into a reality, please e-mail us at shade.institute.hi@gmail.com stating "I support this petition" and we will add your name to our petition.



rsz_171122_river_walk_proposed_concept_board.jpg
rsz_171122_market_kiosk.jpg

July 17th Waipio Access Point Road Improvements: Aloha Clubhouse Community Meeting

“I am worried about the abandoned vehicles on the High School side. Why isn’t the city doing anything to maintain that area? It’s getting worse on that side of the road. People are walking on the residents’ side. Last week a biker flipped in his front lawn because the road isn’t even. Many of the houses on the road are multi-resident, so parking is a need.” -Resident Gary expressing his voice

“I am worried about the abandoned vehicles on the High School side. Why isn’t the city doing anything to maintain that area? It’s getting worse on that side of the road. People are walking on the residents’ side. Last week a biker flipped in his front lawn because the road isn’t even. Many of the houses on the road are multi-resident, so parking is a need.” -Resident Gary expressing his voice

Community members met at the Aloha Clubhouse in Waipahu to discuss plans for Waipio Point Access Road Multi-modal and Safety Improvements. The Access Road has been a community project for nearly 10 ongoing years stemming from the Aloha Clubhouse's need. The meeting was for residents of the Access Road to collaborate on parking, safety, flooding concerns. Attendees included residents, Waipahu High School Faculty, Aloha Clubhouse members, City Council.

Questions from the meeting are as follow:

a.   Has this project been approved by the city?

b.   How long will the process of getting the project approved be?

c.    Where will the funding come from?

d.   Is there a backup plan for the funding?

e.   Will there be street lighting in the plan

f.     How long will the project take to complete?

g.   How can people help?

h.     How is the Navy helping with the project?

i.     Does the Navy know about the project plans?

j.    How will people get along safely during construction?

 

Another community meeting will be held in the next couple weeks at the Clubhouse.

PID Workshop at East-West Center

PID or Public Interest Design is about collaboration between planning professionals and their community partners. Based on Social, Economic, Environmental Design (SEED) methodology, this way of community design extends past "green design."

 

With Speakers Sue Thering and Jeff Hou, the group discussed the process and outcome of case studies centered around community and client engagement. 

By having people understand and participate in the process of design, the community builds society equity. Putting into common terms how community members can learn new skills can penetrate barrier between public and design professionals.

Design is an agent to bring parts and dialogues together. Public space is a platform for growing community capacity building and community participation. 

In Public Interest Design, the community is the client.