July 17th Waipio Access Point Road Improvements: Aloha Clubhouse Community Meeting

“I am worried about the abandoned vehicles on the High School side. Why isn’t the city doing anything to maintain that area? It’s getting worse on that side of the road. People are walking on the residents’ side. Last week a biker flipped in his front lawn because the road isn’t even. Many of the houses on the road are multi-resident, so parking is a need.” -Resident Gary expressing his voice

“I am worried about the abandoned vehicles on the High School side. Why isn’t the city doing anything to maintain that area? It’s getting worse on that side of the road. People are walking on the residents’ side. Last week a biker flipped in his front lawn because the road isn’t even. Many of the houses on the road are multi-resident, so parking is a need.” -Resident Gary expressing his voice

Community members met at the Aloha Clubhouse in Waipahu to discuss plans for Waipio Point Access Road Multi-modal and Safety Improvements. The Access Road has been a community project for nearly 10 ongoing years stemming from the Aloha Clubhouse's need. The meeting was for residents of the Access Road to collaborate on parking, safety, flooding concerns. Attendees included residents, Waipahu High School Faculty, Aloha Clubhouse members, City Council.

Questions from the meeting are as follow:

a.   Has this project been approved by the city?

b.   How long will the process of getting the project approved be?

c.    Where will the funding come from?

d.   Is there a backup plan for the funding?

e.   Will there be street lighting in the plan

f.     How long will the project take to complete?

g.   How can people help?

h.     How is the Navy helping with the project?

i.     Does the Navy know about the project plans?

j.    How will people get along safely during construction?

 

Another community meeting will be held in the next couple weeks at the Clubhouse.

PID Workshop at East-West Center

PID or Public Interest Design is about collaboration between planning professionals and their community partners. Based on Social, Economic, Environmental Design (SEED) methodology, this way of community design extends past "green design."

 

With Speakers Sue Thering and Jeff Hou, the group discussed the process and outcome of case studies centered around community and client engagement. 

By having people understand and participate in the process of design, the community builds society equity. Putting into common terms how community members can learn new skills can penetrate barrier between public and design professionals.

Design is an agent to bring parts and dialogues together. Public space is a platform for growing community capacity building and community participation. 

In Public Interest Design, the community is the client.

July 6th Walking Tour

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SHADE fellows Zach and Rhett lead a walking tour today from 9:30-1:20 of the Waipahu and Chinatown neighborhoods. Starting at the Waipahu Festival Market, individuals experienced Hawaii's Plantation Village, rail station progress, and the Waipio Access Road. 

Afterwards, the crowd met in the Chinatown Cultural Plaza, as shown in the routes. 

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July 7th Public Interest Design Workshop

This Friday July 7th, 2017 The Public Interest Design Workshop will be held at the East West Center. Helping design professionals learn skills and methods to proactively engage "Public Interest Design," this new program encourages community partners to learn skills and methods for engaging design professionals.

The curriculum is structured around the Social Economic Environmental Design metrics, which provide a guide for practice, documentation, and showcasing of public interest design projects.

Speakers in the Workshop include:

Susie Chun Oakland, Program Coordinator for the Lanakila Multi-Purpose Senior Center

Jeffrey Hou, Ph.D, Professor and Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington, Seattle

Harrison Rue, the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Administrator of the City & County of Honolulu, Department of Planning and Permitting.

Dean Sakamoto FAIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Practicing architect and director of the SHADE Institute

Mary Pat Waterhouse, Community volunteer

Susan Thering, Program Manager at Design Corps.

Summer Fellows and Dean Sakamoto reviewing drawings of Waipoua access road 

Summer Fellows and Dean Sakamoto reviewing drawings of Waipoua access road 

 

On July 6th, SHADE summer fellows will lead a Waipahu & Chinatown tour that familiarizes workshop participants with the two neighborhoods SHADE has been working with.